Car Squeaking When Turning (Possible Causes & Solutions)

Car Squeaking When Turning

A car’s suspension system is a complex network of springs, shock absorbers, and other devices that make the ride as smooth as possible. If your vehicle starts making a squeaking noise when you turn or maneuver at slow speeds, it could be time to have your car’s suspension checked.

Read on for possible causes of this problem:

#1 – Worn Out Bearings In Front Shocks

Most of the time, a car’s suspension squeaking is due to worn out bearings in front shocks. This can be caused by driving under very rough conditions such as driving over potholes. But it could also just be a normal wear and tear on the part due to age. When this happens, you probably will not notice any change in how your vehicle handles or rides.

The best way to diagnose this problem is to have a mechanic perform an inspection of your shock absorbers while they’re still on the car. If the bearings are indeed shot, they will need to be replaced along with some other parts that also support them. Unless you have experience doing this yourself, it’s best to leave the work to a professional.

After you get new shocks installed, you’ll need to bring your car in for another inspection after about 500 miles of driving on them. This is because there may be some other problems that will surface after the shock absorbers settle into their functions. Replacing suspension components can cause uneven tire wear for example – which also needs to be inspected and corrected if necessary.

#2 – Tire Tread Separating From The Tire (Example 1 | Example 2)

Another common cause of squeaks when turning are damaged or defective tires that are separating from the inner lining or “beads” that hold them onto the wheel rims. If this is happening, it will sound like there are pebbles or other objects inside your tire. Sometimes it can be really difficult to tell whether the noise is actually coming from your tires or front shock absorbers, so take this for a drive and find a wide open space where you can make several turns back and forth.

If the sound happens only when you turn right or left, then it’s probably not your tires. However if the noise continues when you straighten out again, then one of the wheels could have an issue with poor adhesion to their hubs. Tires that are separating are also more likely to cause damage to your rims due to them flapping against them while driving. And in some cases they may even catch on fire when turning under heavy acceleration!

If your tires show signs of separating, you should immediately replace them as well as take your car in for a safety inspection. You can also try re-seating the tires yourself by using a tire iron to pry them back onto the wheel hubs. But if they still peel off after this procedure, it’s time to get new ones installed.

#3 – Bad Front Shocks (Also see #1)

Another common cause is bad front shock absorbers that are failing under stress when turning at low speeds. Although this problem may seem like it belongs with #1 on our list, there are actually different symptoms that will occur depending on what kind of shock absorber is faulty (gas or oil).

#4 – Frayed Brake Lines

If your car’s brakes are worn down or you have a history of problems with your braking system due to faulty parts, it could be that your brake lines are frayed. When this happens, the metal inside the inner lining of the rubber hose can rub against itself creating squeaks at low speeds when turning. If it’s not stopped immediately, this problem will only worsen until the day comes where you have no brakes at all – which is very dangerous!

#5 – Loose Suspension Parts/Sway Bar Linkage

Sometimes suspension components might just need some tightening up. If you’re constantly experiencing noises when taking turns but they go away after re-tightening any bolts or screws on your vehicle then this may be the cause.

#6 – Loose Fuel Lines / Hoses

Gasoline is a liquid that’s under a lot of pressure when in liquid form. This is why when it turns into vapour from the heat from your engine, it can expand to several times its usual size when in liquid state. If you have any cracks, tears or other damage to your fuel lines and hoses, gasoline may be leaking out and causing your engine to run much less efficiently than usual – which could also cause it to produce excess noise. Before starting your car up, always make sure there are no puddles of fuel or strong odours coming from under the hood!

A common place for gas leaks on some vehicles is near where the brake lines attach to the suspension. This is because over time, fuel can seep out from old and worn out hoses that have been exposed to heat and pressure for a long time. Replacing these lines is necessary if they’re cracked or show signs of serious damage (such as visible holes). If your vehicle has plastic lines however, you’ll need to check with your manufacturer whether they can be repaired or not.

#7 – Engine Mounts That Are Worn / Damaged

If your engine mounts are loose or broken, it’s likely that you will hear loud squeaks every time you turn the wheel. The same goes for engine mounts that are simply worn down by age or weathering over time – though this problem usually only becomes worse when the car is actually moving.

#8 – Loose Silencer/Catalytic Converter Surroundings

If the noise only happens when your vehicle is in motion, then it could be that there’s too much play or movement between certain parts around your catalytic converter. This type of part requires rubber mountings to ensure the engine vibrations are dampened and don’t create unwelcome noises by travelling through certain components. If these mountings wear out over time, you may experience additional engine noise when accelerating until they eventually need to be replaced.

#9 – Engine Wiring Harness That Is Peeling Away From Fender Liner (Also see #1)

A problem with wiring harnesses can also cause strange sounds while turning slowly at low speeds. If your engine is quite old or it’s doing a lot of work to keep the car running (i.e if you have an aftermarket performance parts installed), wires will eventually get hot and peel away from the fender liner over time (see picture on right). This problem gets worse with age until one day, you’ll experience additional strange sounds when turning or braking – especially at slow speeds. Fixing these issues can be costly but worth it for the safety factor alone!

#10 – Broken/Worn Universal Joints on Front Axle Shafts

If your vehicle experiences noises that seem like they’re coming from the front wheels only while turning slowly at low speeds, then there’s a good chance this could be your problem. Universal joints are meant to give the steering column smooth movement around turns, but if these joints are worn/broken, you can experience strange creaking sounds because of this added resistance. Replacing universal joints usually fixes this issue for good!

#11 – Propeller Shaft (Also see #4)

If your vehicle experiences noises that seem like they’re coming from the rear wheels only while turning slowly at low speeds then there’s a good chance this could be your problem. A propeller shaft is one of many components that connect both sets of wheels together on front-wheel drive vehicles. If you don’t inspect it regularly for damage or signs of wear and tear, strange noises may start appearing around tight turns when you least expect it. Note: there’s a chance you may hear similar sounds coming from the universal joints or front axle shafts (see above) instead of the propeller shaft because they all work together to transfer power to both sets of wheels.

#12 – Ball Joints That Are Worn Out / Damaged

Do your vehicle’s steering and handling feel somewhat numb? If so, then this could be because one or more of your ball joints are either worn out or damaged beyond repair. Unless you’re experienced with automotive repairs, it’s best to leave these jobs up to your mechanic as poor alignment usually happens when this part fails completely. Keep in mind that there are two different types of ball joints on modern vehicles however; rubber boots/bushings and metal ball joints. An oil leak related to a rubber boot/bushing can create strange sounds when turning slowly at low speeds – especially if the problem is prevalent only in the front or rear of your vehicle.

#13 – Tie Rod Ends That Are Worn Out / Damaged

Have you noticed that one side of your vehicle’s steering feels somewhat numb? If so, then this could be because one or more of your tie rod ends are either worn out or damaged beyond repair. Unless you’re experienced with automotive repairs, it’s best to leave these jobs up to your mechanic as poor alignment usually happens when this part fails completely. Keep in mind that there are two different types of tie rods ends on modern vehicles; rubber boots/bushings and metal ends. An oil leak related to a rubber boot/bushing can create strange sounds when turning slowly at low speeds – especially if the problem is prevalent only in the front or rear of your vehicle.

#14 – Worn Out Rear Drum Brake Shoes (Also see #1, #6)

A common cause for strange noises when turning slowly at low speeds involves the brake system. Worn out drum brake shoes generally produce a rhythmic metallic sound that increases with speed until they’re completely worn out. In most cases, replacing them generally stops this noise from occurring altogether but sometimes new shoes don’t do anything because there’s something else wrong with your car’s brakes! That being said, it’s best to have your brake shoes inspected by a mechanic as soon as possible to determine the exact cause of your problem. Note: this issue can also come from worn out/damaged disc brakes on some modern vehicles as well; not just drum brakes!

#15 – Worn Out Front Disc Brake Pads (Also see #1, #6)

A common cause for strange noises when turning slowly at low speeds involves the brake system. Worn out front disc brake pads generally produce a rhythmic squealing noise that increases with speed until they’re completely worn out. In most cases, replacing them generally stops this noise from occurring altogether but sometimes new pads don’t do anything because there’s something else wrong with your car’s brakes! That being said, it’s best to have your brake pads inspected by a mechanic as soon as possible to determine the exact cause of your problem. Note: this issue can also come from worn out/damaged rear disc brakes on some modern vehicles as well; not just front disc brakes!

#16 – Unbalanced Tire Pressure

Unbalanced tire pressure is a common cause for strange noises when turning slowly at low speeds. If your tires aren’t properly balanced, one or more sections of the front end could be vibrating excessively under certain conditions – especially when going around tight turns at slow speeds. Please note that most newer vehicles have TPMS sensors which detect tire pressure issues and will warn you about them via an indicator light. In most cases, the light will inform you that the pressure is low and if this is the case then you can resolve your problem by pumping more air into your tires.

10 Possible Solutions of Car Squeaking When Turning:

#1 – Remove Your Exterior Headlights If your squeaking is caused by worn out/damaged headlight wiring that’s shorting out, then this might be able to get rid of your problem. Note: also make sure your headlights are properly aimed at the road ahead.

#2 – Replace Your Worn Out/Damaged Front Brake Pads First, check if you have an indicator light or message on your dashboard letting you know that one or more of the front brake pads are low. If so, then replacing these is likely to resolve this issue quite quickly. Keep in mind however that replacing brake pads usually doesn’t fix anything else wrong with the brakes themselves unless the new ones are put in correctly . Replacing them yourself is generally not recommended, but it’s possible. You can contact your local dealership or repair shop for more information about this topic.

#3 – Clean Out Your Brake Calipers Worn out brake calipers can cause weird squeaking sounds when making tight turns at low speeds. To check if the brakes themselves are the source of your problem, have a mechanic inspect them to see what type of condition they’re in and replace them as necessary.

#4 – Get Your Tires Balanced And Aligned If you have a tire that isn’t balanced correctly then it could be vibrating excessively under certain conditions while turning slowly at low speeds – especially on hot surfaces! Have a professional mechanic from YourMechanic perform an inspection of each tire to determine if they’re balanced and aligned correctly.

#5 – Have A Technician Inspect The Front-End Suspension If your squeaking is caused by something else in the front end, then it’s likely that a mechanic will be able to identify the specific area that needs to be replaced or repaired during an inspection. Note: beware of mechanics who try to sell you expensive parts/repair work even though there are several possible sources of your problem!

#6 – Get Your Brake Calipers Cleaned Out Replacing worn out brake pads generally doesn’t fix anything else wrong with the brakes themselves unless new ones are put in correctly . Cleaning out your brake calipers can therefore tighten up any loose connectors inside them which could have been causing excessive vibration under certain conditions. Note: this might not be necessary if your calipers are in good condition, so have a mechanic inspect them to be sure.

#7 – Have A Mechanic Disconnect And Re-Connect Your Front Sway Bar If your squeaking is caused by something loose in the front end, then having a technician disconnect and re-connect it could fix this problem quickly. This can also help resolve any kind of rattling or vibration problems in the front end under certain driving conditions (especially at low speeds when turning). Note: each vehicle will likely need its own specific procedure for doing this; therefore you should ask your local repair shop for more information about this task specifically.

#8 – Check The Struts On Your Car If your squeaking is caused by something loose in the front end, then having a technician disconnect and re-connect it could fix this problem quickly. This can also help resolve any kind of rattling or vibration problems in the front end under certain driving conditions (especially at low speeds when turning). Note: each vehicle will likely need its own specific procedure for doing this; therefore you should ask your local repair shop for more information about this task specifically.

8. Have Your Struts Inspected Or Replaced If you have worn out/damaged struts on your car then this might be causing excessive vibration under certain conditions while turning slowly at low speeds – especially on hot surfaces! The thicker your struts are, the better they’ll generally be at absorbing excess vibrations inside your car. Replacing worn out struts is not too difficult of a job for most people with some automotive experience, but you should ask your mechanic to help if any of the steps seem foreign to you.

#9 – Inspect The Engine Mounts Looking under the hood of your car, there are generally two rubber disks on each side which are called engine mounts . They dampen energy from the crankshaft and absorb vibrations so that they don’t filter up into other parts of your vehicle. Having them inspected by a mechanic can determine if they’re loose or damaged in order to figure out where the source of any squeaking noises could be coming from when turning at low speeds. Note: if these mounts are severely worn out, then you might need to replace the entire engine!

#10 – Check The Suspension Arms On Your Car If your car is a little older and has a lot of rust on the underbody looking upwards from behind each tire , it’s possible that some suspension arms may be worn out or damaged . These can sometimes emit squeaking noises while turning at low speeds. Note: having the suspension arms replaced by a professional mechanic will likely solve this problem immediately.

Conclusion:

All of these tips might not apply specifically to your problem, but you should be able to use them all together (and with other things) to resolve any source of squeaking in your car when turning at low speeds. If anything else still seems wrong after following the advice above, then you should ask a professional mechanic near you for more information and assistance.

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